What does

Alliance Cancer Care Arizona treat?

Our team at Alliance Cancer Care Arizona offers treatment for a wide variety of cancers and medical conditions. To learn more about how we can treat your condition, select an option below.

Acoustic Neuroma

A benign, slow-growing tumor type, acoustic neuromas affect the seventh and eighth cranial nerves in a part of the brain known as the cerebellar-pontine angle, or CPA. The eighth cranial nerve has two parts – the cochlear nerve that transmits sound between the inner ear and the brainstem, and the vestibular nerve that helps provide balance. Acoustic neuromas most commonly arise from schwann cells, which produce insulation for the vestibular nerve. Therefore, these tumors are often called vestibular schwannomas.

Bladder Cancer

Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy may be an effective bladder cancer treatment against bladder cancer and may be recommended in combination with surgery and/or radiation therapy, especially for more advanced bladder cancers. There are three different forms of chemotherapy. Neo-adjuvant or primary systemic chemotherapy is used before radiation or surgery to help shrink the tumor. Adjuvant chemotherapy is used after radiation therapy or surgery to destroy any remaining cancer cells. Systemic chemotherapy circulates the chemotherapy throughout the body via the bloodstream when the cancer is metastatic.

Radiation Therapy

Radiation therapy uses high-powered x-rays to shrink tumors and destroy cancerous cells. There are two basic types of radiation therapy: External Beam Radiation Therapy (EBRT) uses highly sophisticated, often robotically controlled systems to irradiate tumors from outside the body. Internal Radiation Therapy (IRT), also known as Brachytherapy, delivers radiation from a source implanted inside the body. Which one is best suited for your particular situation depends on the size, location and stage of the tumor or tumors.

Brain Tumors

A brain tumor is an abnormal growth of tissue in the brain or central spine that can disrupt proper brain function. Doctors refer to a tumor based on where the tumor cells originated, and whether they are cancerous (malignant) or not (benign).

The least aggressive type of brain tumor is often called a benign brain tumor. Benign brain tumors originate from cells within or surrounding the brain, do not contain cancer cells, grow slowly, and typically have clear borders that do not spread into other tissue. Malignant brain tumors contain cancer cells and often do not have clear borders. They are considered to be life threatening because they grow rapidly and invade surrounding brain tissue. Tumors that start in cells of the brain are called primary brain tumors. Primary brain tumors may spread to other parts of the brain or to the spine, but rarely to other organs. Metastatic or secondary brain tumors begin in another part of the body and then spread to the brain. Metastatic tumors are more common than primary brain tumors and are named by the location in which they begin.

The most common symptoms of brain tumors include headaches, nausea, vomiting, changes in hearing, speech or vision, difficulties with balance, problems with memory, or numbness in the arms or legs.

Breast Cancer

Breast cancer is a malignant tumor that develops from cells in the breast. More commonly breast cancer either begins in the cells of the lobules, which are the milk-producing glands, or the ducts, the passages that drain milk from the lobules to the nipple. Less commonly, breast cancer can begin in the stromal tissues, which include the fatty and fibrous connective tissues of the breast. Over time, cancer cells can invade nearby healthy breast tissue and make their way into the underarm lymph nodes, small organs that filter out foreign substances in the body. If cancer cells get into the lymph nodes, they then have a pathway into other parts of the body.

Breast cancer is the second most common cancer in women after skin cancer in the United States and according to the American Cancer Society, about 1 in 8 U.S. women will develop invasive breast cancer over the course of her lifetime. Breast cancer can occur in both men and women, but it is very rare in men.

There are several ways to treat breast cancer, depending on its type and stage. Some treatments are called local therapies, meaning they treat the tumor without affecting the rest of the body. Types of local therapy used for breast cancer include surgery and radiation therapy. These treatments are more likely to be useful for earlier stage (less advanced) cancers, although they might also be used in some other situations.

Cervical Cancer

Chemotherapy

Your medical oncologist or gynecologic oncologist may recommend one of three different forms of chemotherapy. Neo-adjuvant or primary systemic chemotherapy is used before radiation or surgery to help shrink the tumor. Adjuvant chemotherapy is used after radiation or surgery to destroy any remaining cancer cells. Systemic chemotherapy circulates the chemotherapy throughout the body via the bloodstream when the cancer is metastatic.

Radiation therapy in combination with low-dose chemotherapy may be recommended for cervical cancer. Both External Beam Radiation Therapy (EBRT) where radiation is delivered from outside the body, and Internal Radiation Therapy (IRT), where the radiation is delivered via a source implanted within the body, are used as cervical cancer treatments.

Colorectal Cancer

Chemotherapy

Your medical oncologist or surgical oncologist may recommend one of three different forms of chemotherapy. Neo-adjuvant or primary systemic chemotherapy is used before radiation or surgery to help shrink the tumor. Adjuvant chemotherapy is used after radiation or surgery to destroy any remaining cancer cells. Systemic chemotherapy circulates throughout the body via the bloodstream when the cancer is metastatic.

Radiation Therapy

Radiation therapy, which uses high-energy x-rays to shrink and destroy tumors cells, is used in the treatment of both colon and rectal cancers. If you have colon cancer, radiation therapy may be used after surgery to destroy any remaining cancerous cells that may be left behind. In cases of rectal cancer, radiation therapy is typically administered before or after surgery and often in combination with chemotherapy.

Esophageal Cancer

Chemotherapy

Your medical or surgical oncologist may recommend one of three different forms of chemotherapy. Neo-adjuvant or primary systemic chemotherapy is used before radiation or surgery to shrink the cancer. Adjuvant chemotherapy is used after radiation or surgery to destroy any remaining cancer cells. Systemic chemotherapy circulates throughout the body via the bloodstream when the cancer is metastatic. Chemotherapy alone is rarely used as the sole esophageal cancer treatment. It is typically given together with radiation therapy.

Radiation Therapy

Radiation therapy may be used as a primary treatment when surgery is not an option, post-surgery in order to destroy any cancerous cells left behind, or in combination with chemotherapy and targeted therapy. One of several highly sophisticated forms of External Beam Radiation Therapy (EBRT) or Internal Radiation Therapy (IRT) may be recommended depending on the size and location of the tumor or tumors.

Gynecologic Cancer

Gynecologic cancers originate in the female reproductive organs, including the cervix, ovaries, fallopian tubes, uterus, vagina and vulva. Radiation therapy is used to treat gynecologic cancers painlessly and non invasively. External beam radiation therapy (EBRT) is an effective treatment for gynecological cancers, working within cancer cells to damage their ability to multiply. During treatment, high-energy X-rays are delivered to the cancer cells with a linear accelerator (LINAC). Treatments are delivered daily Monday through Friday. Each treatment takes about 15 to 30 minutes. The treatment process is painless, safe and will not burn or hurt you. Side effects are usually minimal, and most patients return to routine activities immediately after each treatment. Several factors determine candidacy for radiation therapy treatment including the stage of the cancer, potential side effects, age and overall health. Sometimes a combination of treatments is the best plan for treating gynecologic cancers.

Head and Neck Cancer

Chemotherapy

Your medical or surgical oncologist may recommend one of three different forms of chemotherapy. Neo-adjuvant or primary systemic chemotherapy is used before radiation or surgery. Adjuvant chemotherapy is used after radiation or surgery to destroy any remaining cancer cells. Systemic chemotherapy circulates throughout the body via the bloodstream when the cancer is metastatic.

Radiation Therapy

Radiation therapy may be used as a primary treatment when surgery is not an option, post-surgery in order to destroy any cancerous cells left behind, or in combination with chemotherapy and targeted therapy. One of several highly sophisticated forms of External Beam Radiation Therapy (EBRT) or Internal Radiation Therapy (IRT) may be recommended depending on the size and location of the tumor or tumors.

Kidney Cancer

Radiation Therapy

Kidney cancer is not very sensitive to radiation therapy. External Beam Radiation Therapy (EBRT) is most often used in advanced cases of kidney cancer as a palliative treatment to help ease pain, relieve symptoms and improve the patient’s daily quality of life.

Liver Cancer

Chemotherapy

Because liver cancer resists most systemic chemotherapy, medical oncologists are now injecting the chemotherapy drugs directly into the hepatic artery.

Radiation Therapy

Radiation therapy has the ability to treat tumors with a level of precision that offers an important advantage for liver cancer patients. Accurate to within less than a millimeter, radiosurgery has minimal effect on surrounding health tissue. This level of accuracy enables doctors to target liver tumors with high-dose radiation, which significantly reduces the number of treatments needed – usually between three and five over several days compared to 30-40 over several weeks required for radiotherapy systems.

Lung Tumors

According to the American Cancer Society, lung cancer is the second most common cancer in both men and women and accounts for about 27% of all cancer related deaths. Each year, more people die of lung cancer than of colon, breast, and prostate cancers combined.

Although smoking is the main cause of lung cancer, lung cancer risk also is increased by exposure to secondhand smoke; environmental exposures, such as radon, workplace toxins (e.g., asbestos, arsenic), and air pollution. The risk of lung cancer can be reduced by quitting smoking and by eliminating or reducing exposure to secondhand smoke and environmental and workplace risk factors.

Multiple Myeloma

Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy can effectively slow the progress of multiple myeloma by destroying the cancerous cells. Multiple myeloma can significantly weaken bones and cause them to break. Biophosphonates help to prevent further bone damage.

Radiation Therapy

Radiation therapy for multiple myeloma may be used to shrink and/or destroy tumors and to alleviate pain in areas of bone that have not responded to chemotherapy. An External Beam Radiation Therapy (EBRT) delivery device is used to precisely target the tumor site with a high-energy x-ray beam. Treatments are painless and require no sedation.

Ocular/Orbital Tumors

Radiation therapy is capable of high-dose radiation for tumors or lesions in especially sensitive areas of the brain and is the only radiation therapy system that doesn’t need an invasive head frame. Ocular and orbital tumors can be difficult to treat due to their close proximity to important structures in the brain, and we offer an effective treatment option for these tumors due to the precise nature of the radiation beams we are able to deliver. Ocular and orbital tumors can greatly affect a patient’s quality of life, and radiation therapy offers a treatment option that can preserve a patient’s vision.

Ovarian Cancer

Chemotherapy

Two different forms of chemotherapy may be used as ovarian cancer treatment. Intraperitoneal chemotherapy delivers the drug directly to the tumor area via a thin tube inserted into the abdomen. With systemic chemotherapy, the drug is injected or taken orally and kills cancerous cells as it travels throughout the body via the bloodstream. In most cases, chemotherapy follows surgery. However some women have chemotherapy prior to a laparotomy. Typically two or more drugs are given every three to four weeks for three to six cycles.

Radiation Therapy

Radiation is often prescribed in addition to surgery or in combination with chemotherapy. One of several highly sophisticated forms of External Beam Radiation Therapy (EBRT) or Internal Radiation Therapy (IRT) may be recommended depending on the size and location of the tumor or tumors.

Pancreatic Cancer

Chemotherapy

Your medical oncologist may recommend one of three different forms of chemotherapy. Neo-adjuvant or primary systemic chemotherapy is used before radiation or surgery. Adjuvant chemotherapy is used after radiation or surgery to destroy any remaining cancer cells. Systemic chemotherapy circulates throughout the body via the bloodstream when the cancer is metastatic.

Radiation Therapy

Radiation therapy has been found helpful in treating exocrine pancreatic cancer but not pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. External Beam Radiation Therapy (ERBT) delivers high-powered x-rays from outside the body; precisely targeting and shrinking or destroying tumors. Radiation therapy may be recommended after surgery to destroy any remaining cancer cells and to help prevent a recurrence or slow the growth of the disease.

Prostate Cancer

Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in American men, with about one in seven men being diagnosed with prostate cancer during his lifetime. There are several risk factors associated with prostate cancer, including family history, race, diet, etc., but the most common factor is age. Prostate cancer occurs mainly in older men. About six in ten cases are diagnosed in men aged 65 or older, and it is rare before age 40. The average age at the time of diagnosis is about 66.

While there are a lot of risk factors for prostate cancer, there are also good survival statistics associated with the disease. Survival rates for prostate cancer are very high. According to statistics from the National Institute of Health, almost 3 million men are estimated to be living with prostate cancer in the United States.

Skin Cancer

Chemotherapy

Most chemotherapy drugs for early stage basal and squamous skin cancer are applied in the form of a lotion. For melanoma and more advanced stages of basal and squamous cell cancer, more powerful drugs are distributed via the bloodstream or in pill form to destroy cancerous cells. Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) is a type of chemotherapy where the drug is activated by a light source such as a laser. PDT is only used for early stage skin cancer. The drugs are injected intravenously or rubbed onto the skin in the affected area. Cancer cells absorb these drugs more quickly than normal cells and maintain the drugs for a longer period of time. When the light source is aimed at the tumor, it activates the drugs and kills the cancer cells.

Radiation Therapy

Although radiation therapy is not typically used to treat the original site of skin cancer, it can be used in combination with surgery to destroy any remaining cancerous cells and to help prevent a recurrence. Radiation therapy is also an option for cancer patients for whom surgery is not an option and for those who previously had surgery and whose cancer has returned or spread to the lymph nodes. Radiation therapy can be used to help shrink tumors, preserve function, alleviate pain and control symptoms.

Stomach Cancer

Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy uses drugs circulated through the blood stream to destroy cancer cells. It may be used as the primary treatment in cases where stomach cancer has spread to distant sites and can alleviate symptoms and help prolong life. It can also be used after surgery (adjuvant treatment) to destroy any cancerous cells left behind and prevent recurrence of the cancer. In some stages of stomach cancer, chemotherapy can be used before surgery (to shrink the size of the tumor to make the surgery less complicated. Chemotherapy can also be administered after the surgery.

Radiation Therapy

Radiation uses high-powered x-rays to destroy cancerous tumors and cells. In cases of stomach cancer, External Beam Radiation Therapy (EBRT) may be recommended after surgery to kill any remaining cancerous cells left behind. In advanced cases of the disease, radiation may be used to successfully manage the patient’s quality of life by helping to alleviate bleeding, pain and trouble eating.

Testicular Cancer

Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy uses drugs circulated through the blood stream to destroy cancer cells. It is used if the cancer has spread outside the testicle. It can also be used after surgery if the tumor was not confined to the testicle, to destroy any cancerous cells left behind and prevent recurrence of the cancer. Most chemotherapy for testicular cancer is injected intravenously.

Radiation Therapy

Your doctor may recommend External Beam Radiation Therapy (EBRT) as the primary treatment for seminoma germ cell tumors or in conjunction with surgery such as an orchiectomy, where the testicle is removed. Seminoma germ cell tumors are very sensitive to radiation therapy and this helps to prevent recurrence of the cancer. EBRT is not commonly used for non-seminoma germ cell tumors because they are not sensitive to radiation. Radiation can also be used if the cancer has spread beyond the testicle to treat the area of the lymph nodes.

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